Blog

January 8, 2020

For Immediate Release: January 8, 2020

Montpelier, VT — Cary Brown, Executive Director of the Vermont Commission on Women, announced new resources available today from the Workplaces For All public education program, workplacesforall.vermont.gov, to make workers, employers, and all Vermonters aware of laws that apply to them, their legal rights, methods of reporting, where to find information, strategies for prevention, and ways to address sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace.

Resources available at this new website include:

•             For workers, where to get help if you’re experiencing harassment or discrimination at work — and how to support co-workers

•             For employers, guidance and best practices for prevention and response, a state directory of workplace trainers, and in-depth explanations of different types of discrimination and many resources for more information

•             An extensive video library featuring stories, information, and trainings

•             A new guidebook, Addressing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

•             Infographics, fact sheets, and Frequently Asked Questions about workplace discrimination and sexual harassment

 

In addition to the website, the Workplaces For All public education program includes radio and television public service announcements, social media and search engine advertising, and printed informational materials. These materials and resources have a fresh look, featuring new photography of Vermont workplaces.

The Workplaces For All campaign is a result of legislation which allocated funds to the Vermont Commission on Women (VCW), in consultation with the Vermont Attorney General’s office and the Vermont Human Rights Commission, to inform and assist workers, employers, and members of the public in preventing and addressing sexual harassment and workplace discrimination.

####

Vermont Commission on Women (VCW) is a non-partisan state commission working to advance rights and opportunities for women and girls. Sixteen volunteer commissioners and representatives from organizations concerned with women's issues guide VCW's public education, coalition building, and advocacy efforts.

Contact: Lilly Talbert |Vermont Commission on Women (VCW)
802-828-2841
| Lilly.Talbert@vermont.gov

December 17, 2019

We've updated our info sheet to include up to date information about the movement to eliminate sales tax on menstrual supplies around the world and here in Vermont. Click to download the latest version of our Info Sheet on the Taxation of Menstrual Supplies.

December 13, 2019

December 13, 2019

Montpelier, VT— In recent days, the Vermont media have published detailed stories describing profoundly disturbing reports of sexual misconduct, assault, and abuse at Vermont’s correctional facility for women, the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility (CRCF).

The Vermont Commission on Women has been a long-standing advocate for ensuring that Vermont women in prison are provided equal rights and opportunities and that their health, safety, education, and overall welfare are safeguarded. We recognize that many of the conditions described in the media have been known and acknowledged for many years, without being remediated. In 2012 we joined with other advocates in the publication of “Reclaiming Lost Ground for Vermont’s Incarcerated Women,” in which we called for immediate action to address threats to the health, safety, and human dignity of Vermont’s incarcerated women. We are gravely concerned that without a deep commitment to systemic and cultural change, accompanied by ongoing demonstrated accountability measures by the Department of Corrections and the Agency of Human Services, Vermont will continue to find itself in the same position in the future.

Based on the reported stories of abuse, the Commission has serious questions regarding the ability of CRCF to address allegations in a timely, thoughtful and consistent manner. Every government is supported by a community, and in this case the State of Vermont appears to have failed some of the most vulnerable members of the community. We applaud the swift response on the part of Governor Scott and the Agency of Human Services to commit to an external investigation of the reported incidents, and are encouraged by Agency leadership’s commitment to a more comprehensive and deeper evaluation of the entire system of corrections. The stories reported in the media are symptomatic of a system built upon punitive, rather than restorative, practices, and one that fails to appropriately respond to trauma.

Reaching out to community partners and organizations who provide resources that focus on shifting the system from punitive to restorative responses will allow for a greater opportunity for incarcerated women and men to be successful.

Our concern is not only for the safety and well-being of the Vermonters in the care and custody of the Department of Corrections, but also for that of the staff upon whom those Vermonters depend. It is imperative that the State of Vermont commit to implementing trauma-informed practices that will guarantee that women will not be further traumatized by the people whose job is to protect them; a corrections workforce that is well-qualified, well-trained, and well-prepared to high standards around accountability and professionalism; and correctional officers being supported as professionals and free from harassment on the job themselves.

The Vermont Commission on Women (VCW) is a non-partisan state agency advancing rights and opportunities for women and girls. Sixteen volunteer commissioners, along with representatives from organizations concerned with women's issues, guide VCW's public education, coalition building, and advocacy efforts.

November 5, 2019

Montpelier, Vt. – The Vermont Commission on Women, a non-partisan state commission working to advance rights and opportunities for women and girls, welcomed staff member Anna Brouillette as their new Data Management Coordinator.

Ms. Brouillette will collect, analyze, interpret and communicate data relating to women’s well-being in Vermont.  She’ll work with material from the Commission’s statewide Listening Project; collaborate with State agencies and departments to compile and present data disaggregated by gender; and contribute to the work of their partnership initiative, Change The Story VT. 

“I’m so excited to get started supporting the work of the Vermont Commission on Women,” said Ms. Brouillette. “I look forward to working with the team and further understanding the well-being of women and girls in the state through the use and analysis of data. I am hopeful that the more data that we collect, analyze, and publish related to how we are serving women and girls as a state, the better we can promote equity in opportunities and policies for all Vermonters.”

Ms. Brouillette is currently engaged in pursuit of a master’s degree in Education Policy and Management at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She previously served as Policy and Research Analyst for Let’s Grow Kids; in work supporting civil rights research at St. Lawrence University; and in lobbying efforts of a non-governmental D.C.-based organization concerning funding for federally impacted schools. She holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Lawrence University, where she majored in Government.

###

The Vermont Commission on Women (VCW) is a non-partisan state commission working to advance rights and opportunities for women and girls. Sixteen volunteer commissioners and representatives from organizations concerned with women's issues guide VCW's public education, coalition building, and advocacy efforts.  The Commission celebrates its 55th anniversary this month.

September 30, 2019

League of Women Voters Presents “The Impact of Incarceration: Women, Families, Society
Wednesday, October 9, 2019, 7 p.m.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Room, 135 Main Street, Montpelier

As has the nation's prison population, Vermont’s incarceration rate has grown dramatically in the last 40 years. The League of Women Voters, in partnership with Montpelier’s Kellogg-Hubbard Library, is pleased to present the first of its Criminal Justice in Vermont Speaker Series.

On Wednesday, October 9, three panelists will delve deep into a discussion of issues around women's incarceration: how it differs from men's;  its impact on families and children; and a correctional facility program which utilized writing as a tool for self-change.  The event features a reading from an anthology of the women's work.  Panelists include:

▪ Ashley Messier, Smart Justice Organizer for the ACLU of VT and a consultant for the Cabot Centennial Re-Entry Project. She is a passionate advocate, public speaker, and formerly incarcerated woman.

▪ Representative Marybeth Redmond,  who is helping to lead the Women’s Legislative Caucus in its advocacy for more transformative alternatives to incarceration for women.

▪ Kassie Tibbott, Coordinator of the Community Legal Information Center (CLIC), a research fellow for the Center for Justice Reform at Vermont Law School, a volunteer advocate at criminal record expungement clinics, and a Circles of Support and Accountability volunteer.

▪ Cary Brown, Executive Director of the Vermont Commission on Women, will moderate the discussion.

The program is open to the public and there is no cost to attend. Registration is encouraged, lwvofvt@gmail.com.

Pages

Subscribe to Vermont Commission on Women Blog Feed