Women's Business Ownership and the Vermont Economy, NEW report from Change The Story

Report # 3 from Change the Story - women's Business Ownership

Change The Story VT (CTS) revealed findings on the status of women-­owned businesses in Vermont in a keynote address to Women Business Owners Network fall conference participants in mid-October at the State House. CTS Director Tiffany Bluemle, with Pat Heffernan and Laura Lind‐Blum of Research Partners, and Vermont Commission on Women’s Cary Brown unveiled Women's Business Ownership and the Vermont Economy. This report details both exciting opportunities and great success that owning a business holds for women, as well as barriers and challenges faced, with focus on latent potential.  Like CTS’s other reports, this one closes with questions, rather than recommendations in order to generate statewide conversations and deepen understanding.  Link here to read the report.  Women's Business Ownership and the Vermont Economy findings include:

Women-owned businesses are vital to Vermont’s economy.

  • Women own 23,417 businesses in Vermont, which employ 36,326 people, and generate annual revenues of approximately $2.2 billion.

Although growing at a faster rate than businesses owned by men, women-owned firms in Vermont are fewer in number, smaller in size, and lower in annual revenues.

  • Between 2007-2011, the number of female-owned businesses grew 15%; during the same period male-owned businesses grew by only 6%.
  • Women-owned businesses generate 9% of gross revenues and employ 12% of workers in privately-held Vermont firms.
  • Women business owners are significantly underrepresented in 9 of the 10 highest grossing sectors. This limits financial opportunities for individual women and their potential contributions to Vermont’s economy.

Women-owned businesses have the potential to play a much bigger role in Vermont’s economic development.

  • If the percent of women-owned businesses that are employers matched that of male-owned businesses, and those firms had the same average receipts, it would add $3.8 billion to Vermont’s economy.
  • If Vermont women chose business ownership at the same rate as men, it would result in more than 10,500 new businesses.
  • If just 1 in 4 of the existing 20,786 women-owned businesses without employees hired just one worker, it would result in an additional 5,200 new jobs.

Maximizing the potential of women-owned businesses – and indeed all of VT businesses – requires new and better data. 

  • While existing business-related data sources can provide reliable top-line statistics, they are less useful in revealing nuanced information about the motivations, challenges or opportunities experienced by Vermont business owners. Focusing on the finer points of what makes a business successful is critical to Vermont’s economic future.

Women-owned businesses are vital to Vermont’s economy.

  • Women own 23,417 businesses in Vermont, which employ 36,326 people, and generate annual revenues of approximately $2.2 billion.

Although growing at a faster rate than businesses owned by men, women-owned firms in Vermont are fewer in number, smaller in size, and lower in annual revenues.

  • Between 2007-2011, the number of female-owned businesses grew 15%; during the same period male-owned businesses grew by only 6%.
  • Women-owned businesses generate 9% of gross revenues and employ 12% of workers in privately-held Vermont firms.
  • Women business owners are significantly underrepresented in 9 of the 10 highest grossing sectors. This limits financial opportunities for individual women and their potential contributions to Vermont’s economy.

Women-owned businesses have the potential to play a much bigger role in Vermont’s economic development.

  • If the percent of women-owned businesses that are employers matched that of male-owned businesses, and those firms had the same average receipts, it would add $3.8 billion to Vermont’s economy.
  • If Vermont women chose business ownership at the same rate as men, it would result in more than 10,500 new businesses.
  • If just 1 in 4 of the existing 20,786 women-owned businesses without employees hired just one worker, it would result in an additional 5,200 new jobs.

Maximizing the potential of women-owned businesses – and indeed all of VT businesses – requires new and better data. 

  • While existing business-related data sources can provide reliable top-line statistics, they are less useful in revealing nuanced information about the motivations, challenges or opportunities experienced by Vermont business owners. Focusing on the finer points of what makes a business successful is critical to Vermont’s economic future.